Past Events

2016 Events

ProAction, Presented by the University of Pittsburgh and Theater Delta (November 2016)

An interactive theatre performance on the graduate student-faculty mentor relationship in the campus community.

Are You Aware? Presented by the University of Pittsburgh and Theater Delta (November 2016)

An interactive theatre performance exploring obstacles to increasing diversity in faculty hiring.

Students with Disabilities, Rory Cooper, Human Engineering Research Laboratories (November 2016, Understanding Our Students Series)

The coming year (2016–17) has been designated as The Year of Diversity by the Provost, giving the topics of diversity, inclusion, and understanding a special emphasis at the University of Pittsburgh. The Office of the Provost has initiated a special partnership with the University Center for Teaching and Learning to offer many professional and personal development opportunities throughout the year with a special focus on understanding the intersection of various identities within the student experience. We hope this particular series will give faculty a chance to hear what our students have to say about this important topic and to reflect on what it means for their teaching practice.

Transamerica, Julie Beaulieu, Gender, Sexuality, & Women’s Studies, and Julian Gill-Peterson (November 2016, Diversity in Modern Culture Film Series)

Participants joined the University Center for Teaching and Learning for Diversity in Modern Culture, a film series with four unique films. This film, Transamerica, was about a pre-operative male-to-female transsexual who takes an unexpected journey when she learns that she fathered a son, now a teenage runaway hustling on the streets of New York (www.imdb.com/title/tt0407265/). A discussion followed the film, led by University of Pittsburgh faculty.

African American Student Experience: Perceptions & Reflections, James Huguley, School of Social Work (October 2016, Understanding Our Students Series)

The coming year (2016–17) has been designated as The Year of Diversity by the Provost, giving the topics of diversity, inclusion, and understanding a special emphasis at the University of Pittsburgh. The Office of the Provost has initiated a special partnership with the University Center for Teaching and Learning to offer many professional and personal development opportunities throughout the year with a special focus on understanding the intersection of various identities within the student experience. We hope this particular series will give faculty a chance to hear what our students have to say about this important topic and to reflect on what it means for their teaching practice.

Religious Diversity in the Classroom, Lynn Coghill, School of Social Work, & Adam Shear, Religious Studies (October 2016, Understanding Our Students Series)

The coming year (2016–17) has been designated as The Year of Diversity by the Provost, giving the topics of diversity, inclusion, and understanding a special emphasis at the University of Pittsburgh. The Office of the Provost has initiated a special partnership with the University Center for Teaching and Learning to offer many professional and personal development opportunities throughout the year with a special focus on understanding the intersection of various identities within the student experience. We hope this particular series will give faculty a chance to hear what our students have to say about this important topic and to reflect on what it means for their teaching practice.

Political Diversity in the Classroom, Andrew Lotz, Political Science (September 2016, Understanding Our Students Series)

The coming year (2016–17) has been designated as The Year of Diversity by the Provost, giving the topics of diversity, inclusion, and understanding a special emphasis at the University of Pittsburgh. The Office of the Provost has initiated a special partnership with the University Center for Teaching and Learning to offer many professional and personal development opportunities throughout the year with a special focus on understanding the intersection of various identities within the student experience. We hope this particular series will give faculty a chance to hear what our students have to say about this important topic and to reflect on what it means for their teaching practice.

Understanding the Background & Academic Preparation of Students from Chinese Cultures, Meiyi Song, University Center for Teaching and Learning (September 2016, Understanding Our Students Series)

The coming year (2016–17) has been designated as The Year of Diversity by the Provost, giving the topics of diversity, inclusion, and understanding a special emphasis at the University of Pittsburgh. The Office of the Provost has initiated a special partnership with the University Center for Teaching and Learning to offer many professional and personal development opportunities throughout the year with a special focus on understanding the intersection of various identities within the student experience. We hope this particular series will give faculty a chance to hear what our students have to say about this important topic and to reflect on what it means for their teaching practice.

Blacking Up: Hip Hop’s Remix of Race & Identity, Robert Anderson Clift & Yolanda Covington (September 2016, Diversity in Modern Culture Film Series)

Attendees joined the University Center for Teaching and Learning for Diversity in Modern Culture, a film series with four unique films. This film, Blacking Up: Hip-Hop’s Remix of Race and Identity, explored tensions surrounding white participation in hip-hop. Popularly referred to by derogatory terms such as “wannabe” or “wigger,” the figure of the white person who identifies with hip-hop often invokes heated responses. For some, it is an example of cultural progress – a movement toward a color-blind America. For others, it is just another case of cultural theft and mockery – a repetition of a racist past. A discussion led by University of Pittsburgh faculty followed the film. Learn more about the movie: http://www.blackingupmovie.com/

Transgender Students, Julie Beaulieu, Gender, Sexuality, & Women’s Studies (September 2016, Understanding Our Students Series)

The coming year (2016–17) has been designated as The Year of Diversity by the Provost, giving the topics of diversity, inclusion, and understanding a special emphasis at the University of Pittsburgh. The Office of the Provost has initiated a special partnership with the University Center for Teaching and Learning to offer many professional and personal development opportunities throughout the year with a special focus on understanding the intersection of various identities within the student experience. We hope this particular series will give faculty a chance to hear what our students have to say about this important topic and to reflect on what it means for their teaching practice.

An Inclusive Classroom: Practical Lessons and Techniques for Constructing a Truly Open Learning Environment for LGBTQIA Students, Susan Marine, PhD, Merrimack College (June 2016, Diversity Institute for Faculty Development Series)

What does it mean to create a truly inclusive classroom with respect to students’ sexual orientations and gender identities? This interactive workshop explored this question in depth, through the lens of the most current scholarship in LGBTQIA college student identity, needs, and experiences.

Understanding Our Students: A Four-Part Series Exploring the Rich Diversity of Our Student Population; Julie Beaulieu, Rory Cooper, Meiyi Song, and Lynn Coghill, University of Pittsburgh (May 2016, Diversity Institute for Faculty Development Series)

This unique series featured a Pitt facilitator and a panel of students that discussed perspectives of student populations, including transgender students, students with disabilities, Chinese cultures, and students of faith.

You can find a number of the materials for this series online:

Making Online Accessibility Easy and Part of Your Work, Cynthia Ng, National Network for Equitable Library Service (March 2016, Destination Diversity Series)

Accessibility is important, and legislation tells us we need to create content that is accessible, but how? Participants from this seminar were engaged with a variety of methods and strategies to make their digital and online content accessible in a manner that can easily integrate into their existing workflow. Both web content and documents, including PDFs, were discussed.

A recording of this event is available online.

Understanding the Culture and Academic Preparation: Students from China, Meiyi Song, University of Pittsburgh (January 2016, Destination Diversity Series)

Would you like to know how you can best support the Chinese students in your course? Start with understanding their culture and academic preparation they received in China. This workshop provides you an opportunity to consider cultural factors and challenges they may encounter in the U.S. academic settings. Your dialog with a panel of Chinese students in this workshop may help you come up with a plan to support your Chinese students.

This seminar is available online.

Intergroup Dialogue Training, Monita Thompson, and Charles Behling PhD, the University of Michigan (May 2016, Diversity Institute for Faculty Development Series)

Designed to provide the foundational skills and knowledge necessary to facilitate multicultural group interactions, Intergroup Dialogue Training focused on basic group facilitation skills through theoretical and experiential learning on topics such as group dynamics, conflict intervention, intergroup communication, and community building. Participants engaged in discussions, activities, and readings focused on prejudice, stereotyping, privilege, oppression, social identity, group development.

Included online is a handout from this session.

‘Can I Be of Any Help’, A Performance and Workshop on Race Relations in the Classroom, Dr. Ben Saypol, Theatre Delta (April 2016, Diversity Institute for Faculty Development Series)

Theatre Delta performed Can I Be of Any Help?, a short theater piece about racial stereotypes, self-segregation, bystander intervention, and micro-aggressions as they occur in the classroom. Dr. Ben Saypol (of Theatre Delta) continued the conversation that afternoon in a workshop designed to help faculty address inclusion issues in the classroom.

Included online is a list of strategies covered in this performance and workshop.

Film Viewing and Discussion: What’s Race Got to do with It?, Mario Brown, MPH, CHES and Paula Davis, MA, the University of Pittsburgh (April 2016, Diversity Institute for Faculty Development Series)

“What’s Race Got to Do with It?” was a 49-minute documentary film that goes beyond identity politics, celebratory history, and interpersonal relations to consider social disparities and their impact on student success in today’s post-Civil Rights world.

After the viewing, participants engaged in a lively discussion about how race affects faculty, staff, and students in both life and the university setting.

We have included the follow-up handout for you to view.

Navigating Poverty: An Experiential Simulation, University of Pittsburgh (February 2016, Destination Diversity Series)

The Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS) is a learning tool that allows participants to understand, experience, and discuss the realities of poverty. Participants role play the lives of low-income families and interact with various community members as they struggle to provide basic necessities for themselves and their families.

Join your fellow graduate and professional students in Connolly Ballroom at the University of Pittsburgh for this powerful, educational, and immersive simulation.

“Class privilege is the ‘elephant in the room’ when it comes to diversity education. Students who willingly wrestle with race, gender, sexual orientation, and religion often balk at exploring class privilege, which threatens the fundamental myth that all people in the US enjoy equal access to opportunity.” —American Association of Colleges and Universities

Immersion simulations are one of the most powerful learning tools available. After the simulation and debriefing, there will be a discussion of the basic elements of simulations to help you develop or use a simulation within your own disciplines.

Year of the Humanities Logo

Book Discussion: Whistling Vivaldi, Dr. Kevin Binning, University of Pittsburgh (February 2016, Destination Diversity Series)

Written by noted social psychologist Claude Steele, Whistling Vivaldi is a book that examines how stereotypes and social identity affect us and what we can do in light of this information. Steele methodically details the questions that he and his colleagues explored, remarking about their initial surprise at their findings (e.g. marginalization factors of campus life do not wholly explain academic underachievement). Social identity and stereotype threat impact all of us. In the classroom, some of the best students show the effect of stereotype threat on performance. Kevin Binning, Department of Psychology, will facilitate the discussion of current research at Pitt in addition to ongoing efforts at other universities. Registrants attending the book discussion will receive a copy of Whistling Vivaldi, and are expected to become familiar the concept of stereotype threat prior to the discussion.

The audio for this seminar is available online.

Insights from the Urban Classroom: A Panel of Pitt Students, Dr. Lori Delale-O’Connor (January 2016, Destination Diversity Series)

Join the University of Pittsburgh’s Dr. Lori Delale O’Connor as she facilitates a discussion with several Pitt students about their experiences, observations, and suggestions for teaching incoming Pitt students who hail from urban high schools. Attendees will have the opportunity to pose their own questions and engage both Dr. Delale O’Connor and her panelists about the latest research from urban education and social equity.

This seminar is available online.

2015 Events

‘Are You Aware?’ – Examining Implicit Bias, Dr. Ben Saypol, Theatre Delta (November 2015, Destination Diversity Series)

Participants for this event witnessed a scene about hiring of a STEM faculty member. They then had the opportunity to interact with and challenge question the character in the scene.  Finally, they participated in a facilitated discussion about the issues of implicit bias in hiring practices.

Here, we have included Dr. Saypol’s solutions and resources to implicit and unconscious bias.

Race in America, Dr. Ralph Bangs, University of Pittsburgh (June 2015, Diversity Institute for Faculty Development Series)

Participants dug deeply into the concept of race in America and how conceptions of race can play out in the classroom. Instruction was provided on how to build curriculum in a way that “transforms conversations about race, quality, and social justice in the classroom.”

We have included the program breakdown.

Building Faculty Awareness and Capacity – Discovering the Role of Unconscious Bias in Classroom Pedagogy and Dynamics, Dr. Audrey Murrell & Dr. Ray Jones, University of Pittsburgh (May 2015, Diversity Institute for Faculty Development Series)

This interactive session was conducted to help faculty understand how unconscious biases can affect our interactions with students and our teaching experiences.

We have included the slides from Dr. Murrell’s and Dr. Jones’ presentation.

“Who Needs this?” An Interactive Theatre Performance and Workshop on Race Relations, Dr. Ben Saypol, Theatre Delta (April 2015, Diversity Institute for Faculty Development Series & November 2015, Destination Diversity Series)

Participants experienced a thought-provoking session that focused on race relations and the student experience.  Also addressed were topics including: racial stereotypes, self-segregation, bystander intervention, and micro-aggressions.

Included are strategies outlined in this session on addressing conflicts around social identities in the classroom.

Making Online Accessibility Easy & Part of Your Work, Cynthia Ng, National Network for Equitable Library Service (February 2015, Destination Diversity Series)

This webinar provided means and tips for making digital and online content accessible and easily integrated into workflow.  Both web contents and documents were addressed.

Included are the slides from Cynthia Ng’s presentation.

An Inclusive Classroom: Practical Lessons and Techniques for Constructing a Truly Open Learning Environment for LGBTQIA Students, Dr. Susan Marine, Merrimack College (May 2015, Diversity Institute for Faculty Development Series)

This interactive workshop explored LGBTQIA college student identity, needs, and experiences and provided participants with classroom practices, curricular integration, and tools for effectively responding to bias, across many disciplines.

All participants left with these materials for Creating an LGBTQ-inclusive Classroom.

Out of the Shadows: Building Inclusive Classrooms for Queer Spectrum and Trans Spectrum Students, Dr. Sue Rankin, Penn State (April 2015, Destination Diversity Series)

This workshop offered insight and practical considerations for construction in university learning spaces that is inclusive for all learners. The presentation gave special consideration to the queer spectrum students and challenged faculty to think about their classrooms in new ways.

Here, we have provided the slide’s from Dr. Rankin’s presentation.

2014 Events

Diversity 2020 Summit, University of Pittsburgh (June 2014)

The purpose of the diversity 2020 Summit was to start a year-long conversation within the University of Pittsburgh community about diversity in the curriculum, and ways to promote diversity awareness across the faculty in the curriculum. This conversation was meant to provide critically important input as we work toward the development of a vision for diversity awareness, and a plan to achieve the vision by 2020.

Here is the agenda from the Diversity 2020 Summit.

The Academic Experience of International Students, Lenka Garimella, Georgia State University (June 2014, Destination Diversity Series)

Participants in this seminar learned about teaching and working with international students, covering topics such as: writing a universally clear syllabus; testing on content, not on culture; and facilitating class conversations for all.

This seminar is available online via CIDDE’s media site.

The Classroom Climate for LGBTQ Students: How does it Impact Learning?, Dr. Michele DiPietro, Kennesaw State University (April 2014, Destination Diversity Series)

This seminar featured the seven principles of learning (Ambrose et al. 2010) as a lens of analysis, focusing on how climate can impact each of the seven principles for LGBT students.  Participants brainstormed ways of creating an inclusive, productive climate for all students.

The presentation is viewable online via CIDDE’s media site.

Teaching African American Males, Dr. Dhanfu Elston, Purdue University (March 2014, Destination Diversity Series)

DE City Background (1)

Dr. Dhanfu E. Elston is the Director of Student Success and Transition for Purdue University Calumet in Hammond, Indiana, with over eighteen years of student and academic affairs experience. Dr. Elston’s responsibilities include the development and implementation of comprehensive success and retention programs for underserved student populations, including the enhancement of campus-wide advisement processes. He has held previous higher education administrative positions at Clark Atlanta University and Georgia State University. Dr. Elston received a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Clark Atlanta University, and a doctorate in educational policy studies from Georgia State University. His research includes scholarship in the areas of student retention, learning communities, African American male mentorship, leadership development, white student disengagement, and historically black colleges and universities. He is co-chairperson elect of the NASPA-Higher Education Administrators African American Knowledge Community, and is the former recipient of the NASPA Region III Research and Assessment Grant.